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Course Descriptions

Anthropology

101 Human Biological Evolution (3) UC:CSU IGETC Area 5B

Lecture, 3 hours.
This course covers the concepts, methods of inquiry, and theory of biological evolution and their application to the human species. There is a specific focus on molecular, Mendelian and population genetics, mechanisms of evolution, primatology, paleoanthropology, biocultural adaptations, human variation, and current bioethical issues. The philosophy of science and the scientific method serve as foundations to the course.

102 Human Ways of Life: Cultural Anthropology (3) UC:CSU IGETC Area 4A

Lecture, 3 hours.
This course is an introduction to the study of human culture and the concepts, theories, and methods used in the comparative study of sociocultural systems. Subjects include subsistence patterns, social and political organization, language and communication, family and kinship, religion, the arts, social inequality, ethnicity, gender, and culture change. The course applies anthropological perspectives to contemporary issues.

103 Archaeology: Reconstructing the Human Past (3) UC:CSU

Lecture, 3 hours.
This course is an introduction to the study of concepts, theories, and methods of anthropological archaeology as well as a review of significant data and models that contribute to knowledge of the human past. The course includes a discussion of the history and interdisciplinary nature of archaeological research; dating techniques and methods of survey, excavation, and analysis; cultural resource management; and selected cultural sequences.

104 Human Language and Communication (3) UC:CSU IGETC Area 3B, 4A

Lecture, 3 hours.
This course is an introduction to the anthropological study of language.
This course includes a survey of core topics in linguistics (phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics) and the relationship of language to social, cultural, and psychological factors.
The course may include topics in nonverbal communication, the evolution of language abilities, and historical linguistics.

109 Gender, Sex and Culture (3) UC:CSU IGETC Area 4D

Lecture, 3 hours.
This course provides a world-wide comparison of sexuality and gender as viewed from various perspectives, including the biological/evolutionary, the cultural, the psychological, the historic, and the prehistoric, especially as they relate to the experiences of males and females in contemporary Western society.

111 Laboratory in Human Biological Evolution (2) UC:CSU IGETC Area 5C

Corequisite: Anthropology 101.
Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 2 hours.
This course is a laboratory course that covers the methods, techniques, and procedures used in biological/physical anthropology research. SubjectS include: Molecular, Mendelian, and population genetics; modern human variation; human osteology and forensic analysis; modern primate studies; and the hominid fossil record.

121 Anthropology of Religion, Magic and Witchcraft (3) UC:CSU IGETC Area 4A

Lecture, 3 hours.
This course is an anthropological introduction to forms, functions, origins and expressions of belief systems and rituals within their cultural contexts. Topics include religious symbolism, myth, magic, divination, animism, animalism, shamanism, totemism, ancestor worship, religious specialists, witchcraft, syncretism, millenarian and other religious movements.

132 Native People of North America (3) UC:CSU IGETC Area 3B

Lecture, 3 hours.
This course examines the history, culture, religion, art, and political organization of selected Native North American cultures from pre-Western contact to the contemporary period, with particular emphasis on the processes of social, cultural, and political change in the post-contact period. The history of interactions between indigenous North Americans and other ethnic groups and their relevance to contemporary Native American issues are also explored.

185 Directed Study - Anthropology (1) CSU

Conference 1 hour per week per unit.
The above courses allow students to pursue Directed Study in Anthropology on a contract basis under the direction of a supervising instructor.
Credit Limit: A maximum of 6 units in Directed Study may be taken for credit.
Note: UC Credit for variable topics courses in this discipline is given only after a review of the scope and content of the course by the enrolling UC campus. This usually occurs after transfer and may require recommendations from faculty.

285 Directed Study - Anthropology (2) CSU

Conference 1 hour per week per unit.
The above courses allow students to pursue Directed Study in Anthropology on a contract basis under the direction of a supervising instructor.
Credit Limit: A maximum of 6 units in Directed Study may be taken for credit.
Note: UC Credit for variable topics courses in this discipline is given only after a review of the scope and content of the course by the enrolling UC campus. This usually occurs after transfer and may require recommendations from faculty.

385 Directed Study - Anthropology (3) CSU

Conference 1 hour per week per unit.
The above courses allow students to pursue Directed Study in Anthropology on a contract basis under the direction of a supervising instructor.
Credit Limit: A maximum of 6 units in Directed Study may be taken for credit.
Note: UC Credit for variable topics courses in this discipline is given only after a review of the scope and content of the course by the enrolling UC campus. This usually occurs after transfer and may require recommendations from faculty.


Geology

Earth Science 001: Earth Science (3 Unit Physical Science Lecture Course)

This course surveys the science of whole Earth inquiry by introducing topics from the fields of geography, geology, oceanography, chemistry, astronomy, physics, and biology with special attention to Earth systems.

Earth Science 002: Earth Science Laboratory (2 Unit Physical Science Lab Course)

Students are introduced to the study of Earth materials by learning to identify common minerals and rocks. Interpretations of processes acting on and within the Earth are approached through the study of information contained in maps, aerial photographs, and data sets collected from a variety of Earth-sensing instruments. (Earth Science 001 is a Co-Requisite for this course)

Geology 001: Physical Geology (3 Unit Physical Science Lecture Course)

An introduction to the principles of geology with emphasis on Earth processes. This course focuses on the internal structure and origin of the Earth and the processes that change and shape it.

Geology 002: Earth History (3 Unit Physical Science Lecture Course)

In this course, students receive an introduction to the geological history of Earth and its inhabitants, with emphasis on the evolution of life and landforms of North America. Topics include how Earth processes produce and alter landforms, climate, and energy and water resources on which humans depend; significant tectonic events, such as mountain building episodes; and the evolutionary history of life on Earth, including plants, fish, dinosaurs, mammals, and humans. Multimedia presentations are used throughout the course and field trips are taken.

Geology 004: Physical Geology and Laboratory (5 Unit Physical Science Lecture and Lab Course)

This is an introductory course designed to acquaint the student with a general knowledge of planet Earth. Materials and structures of the Earth are studied along with the processes and agencies by which the Earth is changed. The laboratory supplements the lecture with the study of minerals, rocks, aerial photographs, maps, and analysis of geologic data sets.

Geology 006: Physical Geology Laboratory (2 Unit Physical Science Lab Course)

This course supplements Geology lectures with exercises in rock and mineral identification, reading and construction of topographic maps and profiles, interpretation of geologic maps and diagrams, evaluation of seismic and tectonic data, and the recognition and evaluation of landforms from topographic maps and aerial photos (Geology 001 is a Co-Requisite for this course).

Geology 007: Earth History Laboratory (2 Unit Physical Science Lab Course)

This is a supplemental laboratory course for Geology 2, intended to teach the scientific methods of reasoning and to acquaint students with the fundamental principles of historical geology. Laboratory exercises examine the history of Earth from its origin to the present as interpreted from the fossil record and radiometric dating techniques. Topics include the evolutionary study of fossils, the study of rock types and ancient land forms, and the methods used to determine events in Earth history and reconstruct past environmental conditions. Field trips may be taken. (Geology 002 is a Co-Requisite for this course).

Geology 015: Geological Catastrophes (3 Unit Physical Science Lecture Course)

This course provides a survey of the geological and tectonic forces behind the most common natural disasters on Earth. The course studies how earthquakes, tsunami, volcanoes, mass movements, weather-related phenomena, wildfires and floods are generated, how they affect populations, and specific hazard mitigation techniques. Special emphasis is placed on the disaster risk of the Los Angeles region.