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ELAC PHILOSOPHY COURSES
Phil. 1

-- Introduction to Philosophy

Phil. 6

-- Logic in Practice

Phil. 8

-- Deductive Logic

Phil. 12

-- History of Greek Philosophy

Phil. 13

-- History of Medieval Philosophy

Phil. 14

-- History of Modern European Philosophy

Phil. 19

-- Contemporary Problems in Bioethics

Phil. 20

-- Ethics

Phil. 28

-- Environmental Ethics

Phil. 31

-- Philosophy of Religion

Phil. 33

-- Comparative Survey of World Religions

Phil. 44

-- Feminist Philosophy

Phil. 185/285/385

-- Directed Studies

What do great thinkers say?

"The unexamined life is not worth living."
Socrates

"…effort to understand is the primary and sole foundation of virtue…"
Spinoza

"What is happiness? The feeling that power increases, that resistance is overcome."
Nietzsche

"Men are a thousand time more intent on becoming rich than on acquiring culture, though it is certain that what a man is contributes more to his happiness than what he has."
Schopenhauer

What does all this mean to you?

All the great thinkers recognize this: Mastery of the techniques of philosophical investigation is relevant to the preservation of clarity of thought in every field of inquiry.

The Philosophy Department at ELAC offers a wide range of courses to explore the great ideas of humankind; courses designed to engage you in the philosophic quest for greater understanding and enlightenment; courses intended to satisfy higher-level human needs; courses that increase personal awareness and deepen human tolerance; courses that ultimately get you to think about, and equip you to deal with, life's uncertainties. The Philosophy Department also sponsors the ELAC Philosophy Club. Students meet every Tuesday to discuss, to watch, to create and to philosophize. All students are welcome.

So, come see what prompts many to claim: "I am a lover of wisdom." Come join the great thinkers of the ages –come join the philosophical conversation. Come see what ELAC Philosophy Department is all about!


ELAC PHILOSOPHY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
  • Philosophy 1 -- Introduction to Philosophy: Lecture, 3 hours.

    This course provides students with an understanding of the major topics in philosophy—including metaphysics, epistemology and axiology. Students experience philosophy as an activity characterized by asking questions and answering them through persistent, critical analysis. The study of philosophy helps satisfy higher-level human needs, increases personal awareness, deepens tolerance, refines analytical powers, and equips us to deal with life’s uncertainties. (3) UC: CSU IGETC Area 3B.

  • Philosophy 6 -- Logic in Practice: Lecture: 3 hours.

    This course is designed to foster critical thinking skills, without exclusively appearing to the traditional techniques of formal logic. A number of general issues connected with the rational criticism of arguments are explored. These include a discussion of the special features associated with critical thinking in different fields of argumentation and a discussion of fallacies as non-formal failures in the process of reasoning. (3) UC: CSU.

  • Philosophy 8 -- Deductive Logic: Lecture: 3 hours.

    This course concerns two basic analytical skills: logical and critical analysis. Logical analysis teaches the nature of logical structure. Critical analysis teaches why arguments sometimes fail. Students acquire the skills necessary for success in upper-division college course work. (3) UC: CSU.

  • Phil. 12 -- History of Greek Philosophy: Lecture, 3 hours.

    This course surveys the general historical accomplishments in ancient Greek philosophy from the Classical to the Hellenistic periods (roughly 5th century B.C.E. to the 2nd century C.E). Students critically examine some of the major philosophers of this period, such as Parmenides, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Epictetus, and Aurelius, with the specific aim of discovering how their ideas relate to such topics as ontology, epistemology, politics and human happiness, as well as ultimately uncovering the historical impact these ideas have on human thought. (3) UC: CSU IGETC Area 3B.

  • Phil. 13 -- History of Medieval Philosophy: Lecture, 3 hours.

    This course surveys the general historical accomplishments in western medieval philosophy from the 1st to the 15th centuries. Students critically examine some of the major philosophers of this period, such as Philo, Plotinus, Augustine, Boethius, Erigena, Ibn Sina, Al-Ghazali, Ibn-Rushd, Maimonides, Anselm, Aquinas, Duns Scotus, and William of Ockham with the specific aim of discovering how their ideas relate to such topics as ontology, epistemology, politics and human happiness, as well as ultimately uncovering the historical impact these ideas have on human thought. (3) UC: CSU IGETC Area 3B.

  • Phil. 14 -- History of Modern European Philosophy: Lecture, 3 hours.

    This course surveys the general historical accomplishments in modern European philosophy from the 16th to the 19th centuries. Students critically examine some of the major philosophers of this period, such as Descartes, Spinoza, Bacon, Hobbes, Locke, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Kierkegaard, Marx and Nietzsche, with the specific aim of discovering how their ideas relate to such topics as ontology, epistemology, politics and human happiness, as well as ultimately uncovering the historical impact these ideas have on human thought. (3) UC: CSU IGETC Area 3B.

  • Phil. 19 -- Contemporary Problems in Bioethics: Lecture, 3 hours.

    This course examines moral problems in biomedical ethics, examining the work of philosophers, jurists, biologists, legal theorists, healthcare professionals and researchers. Major ethical theories are examined and applied to contemporary issues such as human cloning, genetic engineering, and assisted suicide. (3) UC: CSU IGETC Area 3B.

  • Phil. 20 – Ethics: Lecture, 3 hours.

    This course introduces ethics in a balanced mix of theory and practice that is unified and coherent, engaging and compelling. As a result of this course, students should be able to: see the moral overtones in their own lives, feel the urgency of ethics, the pressing personal and social need to perceive and confront the moral dimensions of everyday experiences, and understand, analyze, and resolve moral dilemmas. (3) UC: CSU IGETC Area 3B.

  • Phil. 28-- Environmental Ethics: Lecture, 3 hours.

    This is an introductory course on the ethics surrounding ecology. Students examine theories and perspectives, both traditional and contemporary, which have shaped and defined environmental issues, nature, and the role and nature of human beings. (3) UC: CSU IGETC Area 3B.

  • Phil. 31 -- Philosophy of Religion: Lecture, 3 hours.

    This is an introductory survey course covering philosophical considerations on the origin and nature of religious thought; the use of language in formulating religious statements; epistemological exploration of claims based on faith and on reason, noting their similarities and differences; and an introduction to the concept of God including arguments for and against God’s existence. (3) UC: CSU IGETC Area 3B.

  • Phil. 33 -- Comparative Survey of World Religions: Lecture, 3 hours.

    This course provides a survey of the historical development of the world’s great religions including their origins, teachings, growth, contributions to culture, and intellectual history. (3) UC: CSU IGETC Area 3B.

  • Phil. 44 -- Feminist Philosophy: Lecture, 3 hours.

    This course provides a survey of the historical development of the world’s great religions including their origins, teachings, growth, contributions to culture, and intellectual history. (3) UC: CSU IGETC Area 3B.

  • Phil. 185/285/385 -- Directed Studies: Conference 1 hour per unit.

    The above courses allow students to pursue Directed Study in Philosophy on a contract basis under the direction of a supervising instructor.

    Credit Limit: A maximum of 6 units in Directed Study may be taken for credit.

    Note: UC Credit for variable topics courses in this discipline is given only after a review of the scope and content of the course by the enrolling UC campus. This usually occurs after transfer and may require recommendations from faculty. Information about intern-ships may also be presented for review, but credit for internships rarely transfers to UC.