Courses


 

Electrical Engineering Technology (EET)

Prerequisite: Math 125 or 125S or 134.

Lecture, 2 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours; Discussion, 1 hour.

Note: This course is highly recommended for Engineering students planning to take General Engineering 220 and General Engineering 225.

In this introductory course students learn algebra base linear circuit analysis and practice its application to areas of importance in electrical engineering such as resistive circuits, Kirchhoff laws, node and loop analysis, Thevenin and Norton theorems, superposition theorem, capacitors and inductors. Students also perform laboratory exercises to learn how to create circuit designs using electronic components and to use instruments such as multimeters, oscilloscopes, and signal generators.

Prerequisite: General Engineering 121.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 3 hours.

This course is the first step in the three-part NI LabVIEW certification process. It indicates a broad working knowledge of the LabVIEW environment, a basic understanding of coding and documentation best practices, and the ability to read and interpret existing code. Students can use this certification to assess and validate an individual’s LabVIEW development skills for the purpose of project staffing or career advancement.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 261. LECTURE, 3 HOURS; LABORATORY, 2 HOURS. Note: This course is highly recommended for Engineering students planning to take General Engineering 220 and General Engineering 225.

This course applies structured programming concepts to engineering problem types such as center of mass, ballistics, column buckling, design, and reduction of experimental data. Mathematical techniques include interative solutions, bisection, Raphson-Newton, statistics, and matrix operations. Computer programming techniques include formatted input and output, selection, loops, functions, pointers, arrays, and objects. Concepts and techniques of Object Oriented Programming, structured design and modular construction, use of C++ or other high level languages to demonstrate fundamentals of Object Oriented Programming and structured programming are employed. Students use National Instruments Laboratory Virtual Engineering Workbench (LabVIEW) to demonstrate graphical programming environment.

Prerequisite: Electrical Engineering Technology 120.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 3 hours.

This course helps students learn about sustainable energy generation and characteristics. The Emona HELEx ETT411 introduces students to these concepts through hands-on exercises, observation, measurement, and LabVIEW-based data processing, and provides them with the fundamental, underpinning knowledge needed for a future in Engineering.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 3 hours.

In this course, students gain new skills in programming and electronics engineering. Arduino is a groundbreaking, open-source electronics prototyping platform based on flexible, easy-to-use hardware and software. The Arduino board can read sensors, control motors and lights, and upload your hand-build code that interacts with the real world. Students learn the Arduino programming language, which is based on C/C++.

Prerequisite: Math 125 or 125S or 134.

Lecture, 2 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours; Discussion, 1 hour.

Note: This course is highly recommended for Engineering students planning to take General Engineering 220 and General Engineering 225.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 263 and Physics 102.
Corequisite: Mathematics 275.
Advisories: Electrical Engineering Technology 120, and General
Engineering 121.
LECTURE, 3 HOURS; LABORATORY, 3 HOURS.
This course covers electric circuit analysis in time and frequency
domains, transient, and steady state solutions.
Topics include linear circuit analysis techniques, Kirchhoff’s
Laws, Network Theorems, mesh and nodal analysis,
OP amps and amplifiers, Thevenin/Norton equivalents circuits,
natural-forced-complete response of RLC circuits
and Laplace Transforms. Introduction to AC circuits, phasors,
three phase power, and frequency response and resonance.
The laboratory includes experimental verification
of the laws of AC and DC circuits, Kirchhoff’s laws, and
Thevenin’s theorem using instruments such as multimeter,
oscilloscopes, and signal generators. Laboratory will use
National Instruments Laboratory Virtual Engineering Workbench
(LabVIEW) with ELVIS II.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 26

Advisories: General Engineering 121 and Electrical Engineer- ing Technology 120.

LECTURE, 3 HOURS; LABORATORY, 3 HOURS.

This  course  is  an  introduction  to  digital  circuit  analysis. Topics  covered  include  the  following:  Number  systems, computer arithmetic, and binary codes; binary logic, Bool- ean algebra, and logic gates; combinational circuits, anal- ysis  and  design,  including  adders,  MUX’s,  decodes,  etc.; and sequential circuits analysis and design. In the lab stu- dents design, implement, and debug a combinational cir- cuit;  and  perform  implementation  of  combinational  cir- cuits  using  logic  gates  and  programmable  logic  devices and design sequential logic circuits using gates, ROMs, and PALs. Students in the laboratory use National Instruments ratory Virtual Engineering Workbench (LabVIEW) with ELVIS II.


 

Electronics (ELECTRN)

Corequisites: Electronics 122 and 126.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory 4 hours.

This is course 1 of 2 for CompTIA’s A+ Hardware Essentials Certification examination. This training covers all five-course objectives identified in the CompTIA’s A+ Essentials Certification examination. This training helps students to successfully pass the A+ Essentials Certification examination. This IT certification is the stepping-stone for individuals seeking an IT career. The course covers the areas of PC hardware, networking, laptops, printers, and operational procedure. Also, students will have access to a NETLAB+ system, a virtual system that allows topology configuration via online, and upon online completion; students physically configure the topology in class.

Corequisites: Electronics 121 and 126.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory 4 hours.

This is course two of two for CompTIA’s A+ Software Essentials Certification examination. This training covers all five-course objectives identified in the CompTIA’s A+ Essentials Certification examination. This training helps students to successfully pass the A+ Essentials Certification examination. This IT certification is the stepping-stone for individuals seeking an IT career. The course covers the areas of PC hardware, networking, laptops, printers, and operational procedure. Also, students will have access to a NETLAB+ system, a virtual system that allows topology configuration via online, and upon online completion; students physically configure the topology in class.

Prerequisite: Engineering Graphics and Design 101 or Engineering Graphics and Design 102.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 3 hours.

The primary purpose of this course is to teach students to successfully build a level 1 solid fuel rocket. The course begins with basic definitions and elementary principles such as total impulse, mass flow, specific impulse, the ideal rocket equation, thrust chamber design, nozzle theory, heat transfer, flight performance, propellant chemistry, and propulsion operation in space. A detailed investigation of rocket fundamentals is necessary to acquaint the student with 21st century technology. At the end of this course students over 18 will be ready to launch their rocket and if successful receive a Level 1 certification from NAR (National Association of Rocketry).

Lecture, 2 hours; Laboratory 3 hours.

This course introduces the fundamental building blocks that form a modern network, such as protocols, topologies, hardware, network architecture, and network operating systems. In-depth coverage of the most important concepts in contemporary networking includes TCP/IP, Ethernet, wireless transmission, network administration, support, troubleshooting WANs (Wide Area Networks), and security. Students develop the skills to implement the best network topology, hardware, and software for their environment, develop skills to build a network from scratch, and maintain, upgrade, and troubleshoot an existing network. Finally, Students are well prepared to pass CompTIA ‘s (The Computing Technology Industry Association) Network+ certification exam.

Corequisites: Electronics 121 and 122.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory 4 hours.

This course maps directly to Microsoft’s Exam 70-680 & 70-698 Configuring Windows 7 & 10. This course provides students with the technical foundation in current operating system technologies. It covers PC architecture, preventive maintenance, and troubleshooting. It covers operating system installation, configuration, administration and performance optimization. This course also gives students a solid grounding in the fundamentals of computer security like access control, file and folder permissions, auditing and encryption. Students learn how to harden operating systems to repel attacks. This course prepares students to perform operating system support tasks including operating system batch and Windows script file programming. Also, students have access to a NETLAB+ system, a virtual system that allows topology configuration via online, and upon online completion; students physically configure the topology in class.

Corequisite: Electronics 126.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory 4 hours.

This course maps directly to Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate (MCSA) Exam 70-410: Installing and Configuring Windows Server 2012, which is the first of three exams required for MCSA: Windows Server 2012 certification. It covers implementing, managing, maintaining and provisioning services and infrastructure in a Windows Server 2012 environment. This course primarily covers the initial implementation and configuration of core services, such as Networking, Storage, Active Directory Domain Services (ADDS), Group Policy, File and Print services, and Hyper-V. Also, students have access to a NETLAB+ system, a virtual system that allows topology configuration via online, and upon online completion; students physically configure the topology in class.

Prerequisite: Electronics 125.

Lecture, 2 hours; Laboratory 2 hours.

This course provides the training and skills needed to pass the CompTIA Security+ Certification Examination. The course includes but is not limited to: Security authentication overview, email-attacks, web security directory and file transfer, devices, media, network security, and intrusion. Also, students have access to a NETLAB+ system, a virtual system that allows topology configuration via online, and upon online completion; students physically configure the topology in class.

Prerequisite: Electronics 125.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory 3 hours.

In this course, students learn topics of the Python language such as data types, variables, control structures, Python Objects and Oriented Design, standard and advanced mathematical libraries, tool-chain use and Python Frameworks, user-defined classes and abstract collections, single and multidimensional arrays, Python lists, tuples, collections, and dictionaries. Also, students have access to a NETLAB+ system, a virtual system that allows topology configuration via online, and upon online completion; students physically configure the topology in class.

Lecture, 2 hours; Laboratory 7 hours.

This course is the equivalence to parts one and two of the Cisco Network Academy. Part 1 of this course introduces the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of the Internet and computer networks. The principles of IP addressing and fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media, and operations are introduced to provide a foundation for the curriculum. By the end of Part 1, students are able to build simple LANs, perform basic configurations for routers and switches, and implement IP addressing schemes. Part 2 of this course describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a small network. Students learn how to configure a router and a switch for basic functionality. By the end of Part 2, students are able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with RIPv1, RIPv2, single-area and multi-area OSPF, virtual LANs, and inter-VLAN routing in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. Students completing this course prepared to take the Cisco ICND1 and/or CCENT certification exam. Also, students have access to a NETLAB+ system, a virtual system that allows topology configuration via online, and upon online completion; students physically configure the topology in class.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory 4 hours.

This course gives students a solid foundation in the fundamentals of the Linux operating system which plays a crucial role in academic and corporate computing. In fact, Unix/Linux powers more Internet server and corporate networks than Microsoft. The topics include Linux Overview and Architecture, The Kernel and Shell, File System, Users and Groups Management, Permission and Ownership Management, Services and Processes Management. Students gain system-level experience through problem-solving hands-on lab exercises at the command line and in the graphical user interface. Also, students have access to a NETLAB+ system, a virtual system that allows topology configuration via online, and upon online completion; students physically configure the topology in class.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory 4 hours.

This course provides the training and skills needed to pass the Certified Ethical Hacking (CEH) Certification Examination. The course introduces students to the concepts, principles, and techniques, supplemented by hands-on exercises, for attacking and disabling a network within the context of properly securing a network. The course emphasizes network attack methods with the emphasis on student use of network attack techniques and tools and appropriate defenses and countermeasures. Also, students have access to a NETLAB+ system, a virtual system that allows topology configuration via online, and upon online completion; students physically configure the topology in class.

Conference 1 hour per week per unit.

The above courses allow student to pursue Directed Study in Electronics on a contract basis under the direction of a supervising instructor.

Credit Limit: A maximum of 6 units in Directed Study may be taken for credit in any one discipline.


 

Engineering Graphics & Design (EGD TEK)

Advisory: Mathematics 120.

Lecture, 2 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours.

This introductory course covers the fundamentals of traditional drafting, descriptive geometry, orthographic projection, graphical communication of technical engineering information and Computer-Aided Drafting (CAD). Topics include freehand drawing, lettering, and theory of orthographic and multi-view projections as well as Coordinate dimensioning and geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GD&T). An introduction to 2-D CAD software package is presented and instruction includes fundamental tools to be able to create and edit basic drawings by learning and understanding the User Interface of the software. Essential skills developed include creating templates, title blocks, layers, drawing basic geometric objects, using parametric tools, and dimensioning.

Prerequisite: Engineering Graphics and Design 101 or Engineering Graphics & Design 102.

Lecture, 2 hours; Laboratory, 2 hours.

This course is an introductory course in Two-Dimensional Computer-Aided Drafting using AutoCAD. Students learn the basic tools to create and edit a simple drawing. Topics include object construction, object properties, layers, orthographic projections, auxiliary views, parametric tools, basic dimensioning, template building, and plotting.

Prerequisite: Engineering Graphics and Design 101 or Engineering Graphics and Design 102.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 2 hours.

This is an introductory course in Three-Dimensional Computer Aided Design (CAD) and solid modeling. Students learn the concept of creating parts by using features including extrusion, revolve, sweep and loft boss, base, and cut. Other topics covered include creating assemblies and generating engineering drawings from the solid model or the assembly, utilizing SolidWorks 3-D software.

Conference 1 hour per week per unit.

The above courses allow students to pursue Directed Study in Engineering Graphics & Design on a contract basis under the direction of a supervising instructor.

Credit Limit: A maximum of 6 units in Directed Study may be taken for credit in any one discipline.

Note: UC Credit for variable topics courses in this discipline is given only after a review of the scope and content of the course by the enrolling UC campus. This usually occurs after transfer and may require recommendations from faculty. Information about internships may also be presented for review, but credit for internships rarely transfers to UC.

Prerequisite: Engineering Graphics and Design 121.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 2 hours.

Note: Credit is given for only one of EGD TEK 221 and EGD TEK 131.

This course builds on the skills acquired in 2-D and 3-D CAD applications. The course explores advanced computer-aided design techniques using SolidWorks software such as Mold Tools, Simulation and Surface modeling, also students are prepared for the Certified SolidWorks Associate (CSWA) exam. During these training programs, students acquire advanced skills in using the software and design techniques for 3-D structures in various examples toward design, manufacturing, and mechanical applications.


 

Engineering Support (ENG SUP)

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 2 hours.

This is a beginning course in plane surveying for high school students. Topics include horizontal linear measurements using pacing, steel tape, stadia, and electronic distance measurement (EDM); circuit and profile differential leveling; measurement of horizontal and vertical angles; computation of azimuth, bearing, latitude, departure and coordinates and area of a traverse; balancing a closed traverse using the compass rule and rotation adjustments of a closed traverse; and introduction to geographic information system (GIS) and global positioning system (GPS). Technical lectures also include topics pertaining to technical writing and presentations. An introductory topic in terrain modeling using Microstation and/or AutoCAD software is demonstrated and field work is also performed including the demonstration of an unmanned aerial system (UAS).

Prerequisite: Engineering Support 100.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 2 hours.

This course introduces high school students to computer applications and technologies used in civil engineering design works and land surveying field applications.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 241 or 241S.

Lecture, 2 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours.

This is a beginning course in plane surveying. Topics include horizontal linear measurements using pacing, steel tape, stadia and electronic distance measurement (EDM); circuit and profile differential leveling; measurement of horizontal and vertical angles; computation of azimuth, bearing, latitude, departure and coordinates and area of a traverse; balancing a closed traverse using the compass rule and rotation adjustments of a closed traverse; and introduction to geographic information system (GIS) and global positioning system (GPS). Technical lectures also include topics pertaining to technical writing and presentations. An introductory topic in terrain modeling using Microstation and/or AutoCAD software is demonstrated and field work is also performed including a field demonstration of unmanned aerial systems for mapping and terrain analysis purposes.

Lecture, 0.5 hour; Laboratory, 1.5 hours.

This course teaches students fundamental business practices used in technical career opportunities in land development. Such skills include: An introduction to business practices in land development, professional conduct and ethics, proposal writing, office and field research and planning, quantity takeoff, pricing and cost estimates, and technical forms of communications.

Prerequisites: Engineering Support 121.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 2 hours.

This is an advanced computer applications course for land surveyors, civil engineers and technicians. The course teaches the development of geographic information system (GIS) maps, usage of global positioning system for data collection, terrain modeling for both transportation and flood control purposes, surface analysis and as-built surveys using 3D scanners, least square analysis for coordinate adjustments, the usage of a robotic total station, and photogrammetry and remote sensing data acquisition and analysis including the usage and practical application of unmanned aerial systems (UAS’s).

Prerequisites: Engineering Support 201.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 2 hours.

This is an advanced computer applications course for land surveyors, civil engineers and technicians. The course teaches the development of geographic information system (GIS) maps, the usage of global positioning system (GPS) units for data collection, terrain modeling for both transportation and flood control purposes, surface analysis and as-built surveys using a 3D scanner, least square analysis for coordinate adjustments, the usage of a robotic total station, and photogrammetric measurements using aerial photos and remote sensing imagery including unmanned aerial systems (UAS’s).

Prerequisites: Engineering Support 121.

Lecture, 2 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours.

This is an advanced course in plane surveying. Topics include topographic survey, earthmoving quantity take-off, horizontal and vertical curves, construction staking, real property survey using electronic data measurement (EDM), application of global positioning system (GPS) and geographic information systems (GIS), and green surveys. Field work is performed.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 3 hours.

This course prepares students for the State of California, Land Surveyor in Training (LSIT) certificate which is the first step required under California law towards becoming licensed as a Professional Land Surveyor.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 3 hours.

This is an advanced course in boundary control surveying. Topics include history and concept of boundary control surveys and the role of the surveyor; creation of boundary lines, description of real property, metes and bounds, and boundary law; Federal and State non-sectionalized land, easements, reversions, riparian, and littoral boundaries; theory of retracing and resurveying of sectionalized lands, locating sequential conveyances, simultaneously created boundaries, and locating combination descriptions.


 

Engineering Technician (ENG TEK)

Advisory: Manufacturing & Industrial Technology 101.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 2 hours.

This project based learning course utilizes various hands on modules in engineering technology fields, to familiarize and prepare the students for entry level engineering technician positions in industry.

 

Prerequisites: Engineering Graphics & Design 121 and Manufacturing & Industrial Technology 101.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 2 hours.

This is an introductory course into the world of Additive Manufacturing. Emphasis is given to the most common process in additive manufacturing technique such as 3-D printing of polymers. 3-D Laser Scanning and Laser Cutting is integrated to make the digital signature of parts. In addition to theoretical knowledge, students are expected to gain practical experience by manufacturing sample parts in the lab. The class integrates a project-based learning model which develop elements of creative thinking and problem solving used in prototype building and the manufacturing process.

Prerequisite: Manufacturing & Industrial Technology 101.

Lecture, 2 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours.

This is an introductory course on the fundamental skills related to the setup and operation of Computer Numerical Controlled machines (CNC).  Safety, tool selection, machine and controller functions, calculation and input of offsets, are also included.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 2 hours.

This course examines manufacturing/supply chain facility and modern material handling techniques for efficient utilization of space within a plant.  The course provides students with techniques to use in analyzing and designing facilities by considering: plant location, manufacturing layout, material handling, integration of human factors for layout safety and quality, and their implications on design.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 2 hours.

Introduction to the science of measurement as it applies to metrology and inspection in fabrication and manufacturing environments.  The lab work includes common industry measurements and standard practices with emphasis on Microscribe Digitizing Arm Inspection devices.

Lecture, 2 hour; Laboratory, 2 hours.

This course presents fundamental concepts of mechanical drives and systems, including safe operation, installation, alignment, troubleshooting, and maintenance of a range of mechanical drives in automated manufacturing systems.

Lecture, 2 hours; Laboratory, 2 hours.

This course presents fundamentals of mechanical fluid power concepts including hydraulic and pneumatic installation, maintenance, and adjustments for the safecontrol of automated manufacturing systems.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 3 hours.

This course introduces Basic Programmable Logic Controllers, Programming Devices, Ladder Diagrams, and Designing PLC Programs for Automation Processes.

Prerequisite: Engineering Technician 125.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 2 hours.

This course provides the student Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) programming skills using Mastercam software in Computer Aided Design and Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) environments.  Topics include a review of machining and CNC programming fundamentals, process overview, basic 2.5D geometry construction and modification, process and toolpath planning, and 2.5 axis toolpath generation and editing.

Prerequisite: Engineering Technician 135.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 2 hours.

This course introduces in-depth Measurement and Inspection skills utilizing a coordinate measuring machine (CMM) and other equipment.  Concepts of dimensional metrology will be presented by using articulating arms to validate part geometry within GD&T standards.  Advanced skills are developed by doing inspection with vision and/or Laser equipment and reverse engineering activities.

Prerequisites: Engineering Technician 111 and Manufacturing & Industrial Technology 201.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 4 hours.

This course utilizes industrial-level engineering technology based projects under the direction of faculty and/or industrial liasion representative, the student is provided the opportunity to demonstrate the full spectrum of their learning, which facilitates their transition into industry.


 

General Engineering (ENG GEN)

Lecture, 1 Hour; Laboratory, 2 Hours.

Note: This course is open to high school students for concurrent enrollment.

This course provides students with an understanding of the academic and professional behaviors and skills necessary to enhance their chances of success as an engineering major, and ultimately as a professional. The skills include working effectively in teams, goal setting, time management, and developing oral communication skills. Students are introduced to the campus resources available to the engineering majors. Students have an opportunity to work collaboratively with their classmates on most of the assignments and in-class design projects.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 261.

Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 2 hours.

Note: This course is highly recommended for Engineering students planning to take General Engineering 220 and General Engineering 225.

This course applies structured programming concepts to engineering problem types such as center of mass, ballistics, column buckling, design, and reduction of experimental data. Mathematical techniques include interative solutions, bisection, Raphson-Newton, statistics, and matrix operations. Computer programming techniques include formatted input and output, selection, loops, functions, pointers, arrays, and objects. Concepts and techniques of Object Oriented Programming, structured design and modular construction, use of C++ or other high level languages to demonstrate fundamentals of Object Oriented Programming and structured programming are employed. Students use National Instruments Laboratory Virtual Engineering Workbench (LabVIEW) to demonstrate graphical programming environment.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 261.

Lecture, 2 hours; 3 hours.

This course utilizes the MATLAB environment to provide students with a working knowledge of computer-based problem-solving methods relevant to science and engineering. It introduces the fundamentals of procedural and object-oriented programming, numerical analysis, and data structures. Examples and assignments in the course are drawn from practical applications in engineering, physics, and mathematics.

Prerequisites: Physics 101 and Mathematics 262.

Lecture, 2 hours; Discussion, 3 hours.

This is a first course in engineering mechanics. The course considers two- and three-dimensional analysis of force systems on particles and rigid bodies in equilibrium. Topics also include static analysis of trusses, beams and cables, determination of center of gravity, centroids, friction, and moments of inertia of area and mass.

Prerequisites: Chemistry 101 and Physics 101.

Lecture, 3 hours.

This course is an introduction to materials science and engineering and different types of materials used in engineering design, emphasizing the relationships between structure, properties, and processing. Topics include: Atomic structure and bonding, atomic and ionic arrangements and imperfections, crystalline structures, metals, polymers, ceramics, composites including diffusion or atom and ion movements in materials, and mechanical properties and fracture including strain hardening and annealing. An illustration of the differences of materials fundamental and their applications in engineering is also covered.

Conference 1 hour per week per unit.

The above courses allow students to pursue Directed Study in General Engineering on a contract basis under the direction of a supervising instructor.

Credit Limit: A maximum of 6 units in Directed Study may be taken for credit in any one discipline.

Note: UC Credit for variable topics courses in this discipline is given only after a review of the scope and content of the course by the enrolling UC campus. This usually occurs after transfer and may require recommendations from faculty. Information about internships may also be presented for review, but credit for internships rarely transfers to UC.

Prerequisite: Engineering Graphics and Design 121.

Advisory: General Engineering 131.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 4 hours.

This is an introductory course in Engineering Design covering the engineering design process, step-by-step. Students achieve basic Engineering Design Core competency through hands-on, team-based, open-ended design projects. The project work is enhanced with lectures and reading on design theory and methods, and using manufacturing techniques and processes to build prototypes.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 263 and Physics 102.

Corequisite: Mathematics 275.

Advisories: Electrical Engineering Technology 120, and General Engineering 121.

Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours.

This course covers electric circuit analysis in time and frequency domains, transient, and steady state solutions. Topics include linear circuit analysis techniques, Kirchhoff’s Laws, Network Theorems, mesh and nodal analysis, OP amps and amplifiers, Thevenin/Norton equivalents circuits, natural-forced-complete response of RLC circuits and Laplace Transforms. Introduction to AC circuits, phasors, three phase power, and frequency response and resonance. The laboratory includes experimental verification of the laws of AC and DC circuits, Kirchhoff’s laws, and Thevenin’s theorem using instruments such as multimeter, oscilloscopes, and signal generators. Laboratory will use National Instruments Laboratory Virtual Engineering Workbench (LabVIEW) with ELVIS II.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 261.

Lecture, 3 hours.

This is an introductory course for calculations using probabilities and concepts in statistics with a focus on applications to engineering problems. It provides an introduction to fundamental concepts and applications of probability and statistics in engineering, with focus on how these concepts are used in experimental design and sampling, data analysis, risk and reliability analysis, and project design under uncertainty. Topics include basic probability concepts, random variables and analytical probability distributions, functions of random variables, estimating parameters from observational data, regression, hypothesis testing, and Bayesian concepts.

Prerequisites: Mathematics 262 and Physics 102.

Advisories: General Engineering 121 and Electrical Engineering Technology 120.

Lecture, 3 hours; Laboratory, 3 hours.

This course is an introduction to digital circuit analysis. Topics covered include the following: Number systems, computer arithmetic, and binary codes; binary logic, Boolean algebra, and logic gates; combinational circuits, analysis and design, including adders, MUX’s, decodes, etc.; and sequential circuits analysis and design. In the lab students design, implement, and debug a combinational circuit; and perform implementation of combinational circuits using logic gates and programmable logic devices and design sequential logic circuits using gates, ROMs, and PALs. Students in the laboratory use National Instruments Laboratory Virtual Engineering Workbench (LabVIEW) with ELVIS II.

Prerequisite: General Engineering 131.

Lecture, 2 hours; Discussion, 3 hours.

This course covers fundamentals of kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies. Topics include kinematics of particle motion, Newton’s second law, work-energy and momentum methods, kinematics of planar and three-dimensional motions of rigid bodies, work-energy and momentum principles for rigid body motion, and an introduction to mechanical vibrations.

Prerequisite: General Engineering 131.

Lecture, 2 hours; Discussion, 3 hours.

This course is a study of stresses, strains and deformations associated with axial, torsional and flexural loading of bars, shafts and beams, as well as pressure loading of thin-walled pressure vessels. The course also covers stress and strain transformation, Mohr’s Circle, ductile and brittle failure theories, and the buckling of columns. Statically indeterminate systems are also studied.

Corequisite: General Engineering 241.

Laboratory,  3 hours.

This course is the experiment based exploration of the mechanical properties of engineering material through tensile test, torsion, shear, bending, compression, buckling of columns and metallography. This hands-on laboratory provides opportunities to directly experiment the behaviors discussed in the lecture course, General Engineering 241, to operate testing equipment, to analyze experimental data, plot and graph data and to prepare reports.

Prerequisite: Mathematics 261.

Advisory: General Engineering 131.

Lecture, 3 hours.

This course introduces techniques of engineering economic analysis as they apply to cost analysis in engineering projects.  This course covers time value of money, cost optimization, incremental and rate of return analysis, involving probabilistic outcomes, capital depreciation, and the effect of corporate tax analysis in making decisions on engineering projects.


 

Industrial Technology (IND TEK)

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 2 hours.

This course introduces the principles and practices of writing a range of technical documents including emails, letters, technical evaluations and reports, and academic and scientific paers used in the engineering, science, and technology fields. The use of graphical information such as tables and charts are covered as well as technical resumes, letters, and instruction and operation manuals.

Prerequisite: Engineering Graphics and Design 101 or Engineering Graphics and Design 102.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 2 hours

This course covers the principles and practices of visualizing and interpreting engineering drawings and prints, by going over actual prints from various industries. The main topics in the course are the study of drawing types, symbology, drawing management, industry standards, and ASME Y14.5 standard for geometric dimensioning and tolerancing.

Corequisite: Manufacturing & Industrial Technology 101.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 2 hours.

Students obtain skills to solve technical problems by practical applications of basic math and arithmetic in industrial (shop) applications. Topics include: Units of measure and conversions; reading tools of measurement; error calculation and propagation; reading graphs and plots; perimeter/area/volume calculations using geometry.

Conference 1 hour per week per unit.

The above courses allow students to pursue Directed Study in Industrial Technology on a contract basis under the direction of a supervising instructor.

Credit Limit: A maximum of 6 units in Directed Study may be taken for credit in any one discipline.

Note: UC Credit for variable topics courses in this discipline is given only after a review of the scope and content of the course by the enrolling UC campus. This usually occurs after transfer and may require recommendations from faculty. Information about internships may also be presented for review, but credit for internships rarely transfers to UC.


 

Manfacturing and Industrial Technology (MIT)

Corequisite: Industrial Technology 106.

Lecture, 1 hour; Laboratory, 2 hours.

This course engages students with Machine Shop specific topics including; safety practices, hand tools, precision measuring tools, set-up and operation of band saws, drill presses, lathes, mills, pedestal grinders, and power saws. Theoretical and manipulative practical exercises challenge students’ thorough understanding of the subject matter.

Conference 1 hour per week per unit.

The above courses allow students to pursue Directed Study in Manufacturing and Industrial Technology on a contract basis under the direction of a supervising instructor.

Credit Limit: A maximum of 6 units in Directed Study may be taken for credit in any one discipline.

Note: UC Credit for variable topics courses in this discipline is given only after a review of the scope and content of the course by the enrolling UC campus. This usually occurs after transfer and may require recommendations from faculty. Information about internships may also be presented for review, but credit for internships rarely transfers to UC.

Prerequisite: Manufacturing and Industrial Technology 101.

Advisory: General Engineering 151.

Lecture, 2.5 hours; Laboratory, 2.5 hours.

This is an introductory course in manufacturing and manufacturing processes. This course exposes students with the fundamentals of manufacturing such as materials, mechanical properties, and processes involved in the industrial sector. Emphasis is given to processes which are more common in the industry such as, reverse engineering, rapid prototyping, plastics and composites, metal forming and generating tool paths, and casting. In addition to verbal understanding of the issues, mathematical models describing the processes of manufacturing are covered briefly in order for students to understand the relations between the parameters involved in the processes. In addition to theoretical knowledge, students are expected to gain practical experience by manufacturing sample parts in the lab.

Lecture, 2 hours; Laboratory, 2 hours.

This introductory course in robotics emphasizes hands-on experience to build a basic functional robot. Students learn about electric motors, servos, sensors, switches, actuators and their application in a robot. Students learn Basic Stamp computer programming and its integration into a working robotic unit. The course also includes mechanical assembly, connecting electronic components, wiring and soldering, and testing.